The Cuban Art Project Invites Every Cuban in Miami to UN CORTADITO EN EL PAMM To Support Cuban Artists @ The PAMM and the Institutions’ Thursday Events.

 
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MIAMI, Florida February 2, 2014- The Cuban Art Project would like to invite every Cuban in Miami to the Pérez Art Museum Miami on Feb 6, 2014 as they present Cortadito: An evening of Cuban Music Celebrating Amelia Pelaez The Craft of Modernity.  

PAMM is presenting Cortadito, a traditional Cuban Son ensemble that performs music from the 1920-50s. Influenced by the sounds of Son Montuno, Boleros and other early Cuban musical styles, this dynamic group brings you back to a time when Trio Matamoros and Ignacio Piñeiro ruled the airwaves.

Admission is free every first Thursday. Join them every Thursday evening for a variety of talks, performances and screenings, including their  Third Thursdays social event. 

UN CORTADITO EN EL PAMM

Date and Time:
02/06/2014
7:00pm to 9:00pm
Location:

PAMM, 1103 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33132

Metromover: Museum Park station
Self-parking on-site ($2/hour)/www.pamm.org/parking

PAMM is free every first Thursday of the month .

 
Dec. 4, 2013 - Feb. 23, 2014 Amelia Peláez: The Craft of Modernity Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) will present a focused selection of works by Amelia Peláez del Casal (b. 1896 – d. 1968), one of the most important Cuban painters of the modernist era. Alongside artists such as Carlos Enríquez, Wifredo Lam, Victor Manuel and Fidelio Ponce de León, Peláez personifies the primera vanguardia—the first wave of Cuban artists who traveled to Europe before World War II, where they were exposed to Cubism, Surrealism and other contemporaneous styles. When these artists subsequently returned to the island nation, they introduced the artistic innovations they had adopted abroad and transformed them by incorporating aspects of their native cultural and national identities. Peláez is best known for brightly colored, quasi-abstract compositions that feature decorative objects and ornamental architectural motifs, evoking the traditional domestic interiors of Havana. This exhibition will take a socio-historical approach, examining Peláez’s work in the context of the changing material culture and urban landscape of Havana during the first half of the 20th centuryAmelia Peláez: The Craft of Modernity/ Dec. 4, 2013 – Feb. 23, 2014
Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) is presenting  a focused selection of works by Amelia Peláez del Casal (b. 1896 – d. 1968), one of the most important Cuban painters of the modernist era. Alongside artists such as Carlos Enríquez, Wifredo Lam, Victor Manuel and Fidelio Ponce de León, Peláez personifies the primera vanguardia—the first wave of Cuban artists who traveled to Europe before World War II, where they were exposed to Cubism, Surrealism and other contemporaneous styles. When these artists subsequently returned to the island nation, they introduced the artistic innovations they had adopted abroad and transformed them by incorporating aspects of their native cultural and national identities.
Peláez is best known for brightly colored, quasi-abstract compositions that feature decorative objects and ornamental architectural motifs, evoking the traditional domestic interiors of Havana. This exhibition will take a socio-historical approach, examining Peláez’s work in the context of the changing material culture and urban landscape of Havana during the first half of the 20th century.

Amelia Pelaez

220px-AmeliaJGS003Amelia was born in 1896 in Yaguajay, in the former Cuban province of Las Villas (now Sancti Spíritus Province). In 1915, her family moved to Havana, to the La Víboradistrict, and this gave her the opportunity to enter the Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes “San Alejandro” at the rather late age of 20 years (students at this academy usually start at 12–13 years of age). She was among Leopoldo Romañach‘s favourite students. By 1924, she exposed her paintings for the first time, along with another Cuban female painter, María Pepa Lamarque. She transferred to Europe in 1927, and established herself in Paris, although she paid short visits to SpainItaly and other countries.[1]

In Paris, she took drawing courses at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière (1927), and later entered the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, and the École du Louvre. In 1931, she started studying with female Russian painter Alexandra Exter. The Zak Gallery hosted her paintings in 1933, and next year she returned to Cuba.

She received a prize in the National Exposition of Painters and Sculptors in 1938, and collaborated with several art magazines in Cuba, such as OrígenesNadie Parescia andEspuela de Plata. In 1950 she opened a workshop at San Antonio de los Baños, a small city near Havana, where she dedicated herself, until 1962, to her favourite pastime:pottery. She sent her paintings to the São Paulo Art Biennial in 1951 and 1957, and participated in 1952′s Venice Biennale. In 1958 she was a guest of honour and integrated the International Jury of the first Inter-American Paints and Drawing Biennale.[1]

Aside from painting and pottery, she dedicated time to murals, located mainly at different schools in Cuba. Her most important works of this type are a 65-foot-tall (20 m) ceramic mural at the Cuban Ministry of Internal Affairs (1953) and the facade of the Habana Hilton hotel in 1957.

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